Sunday, February 24, 2013

Cook the Books: Dumplings!



I sadly flaked out on the first round of Cook the Books (hosted by Grow and Resist and Oh, Briggsy...). I was mired in a January funk that I couldn't find my way out of. I did make a few things from the excellent Around My French Table by Dorie Greenspan, but nothing felt triumphant (and I'm sure that's nothing to do with the book--I take full responsibility). I did feel triumphant, however, with this month's book, Asian Dumplings by Andrea Nguyen. I just got the book out from the library on Thursday, so I had to get cooking to post this weekend. Having a cold didn't stop me from making two different recipes--that's how approachable this stuff is.


Andrea Nuguyen is a stellar teacher; it shows through the pages. Every step is fully detailed. Her thoroughness is thoughtful and never pushy. I first took on the pan-fried pork and scallion buns because I had everything in house. Sort of. For the filling I fudged a little and used chicken thigh meat, leeks, and salt pork. Really, aren't the idea of dumplings to use up what you have? The dough recipe was exquisite: soft and squishy, not too sweet, and because of working it in the food processor, very accessible.

I already see that these dumplings will now be a part of my routine meal cooking. They are called baozi (mini bao) but I think mine were probably regular sized. I will absolutely have to buy this book. When you live in the sticks like me, you don't have access to  a few squishy bao or a good bowl of dumplings or, at least without a long drive, or some cash. They are neither cheap nor plentiful. Now I have it covered.


Now I must admit: I've made a ton of filled pastas in my life. It was a household task growing up to make ravioli, tortelli or cappilletti, so my fingers are still nimble and know the language of dough folding. I felt like quite a natural at the beginning. I always thought that the exquisite soup dumplings I got were such things of beauty, twirled up so neatly. How did they do it?? I wondered. Well, it's really nothing at all I realized, especially when you make enough of them. Another thing I loved learning was the technique for pan frying these mini-bao: to first fry, then pour water into the hot oily pan to steam. So simple!


My second triumph was the pork and napa cabbage water dumplings. I was intrigued by the technique of using just boiled water to form the simple dumpling dough, whose only other ingredient was flour. I did go out and buy cabbage and scallions this time, but I used (mostly fat) pork belly instead of the fatty pork asked for, so my fat-to-meat ratio was skewed to the fat side. They were very rich, but not overly so. My one mistake was to not really squeeze the water thoroughly from the cabbage. You must do it otherwise your dumplings will be a little wet. But in the end it was just fine. Every single one was eaten!

9 comments:

  1. Mouthwatering! That top picture especially looks so inviting. I am assuming these are made with wheat flour? Are there any good recipes using rice flour in that book? I would love to try my hand at something in this vein...

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    1. Yes, these are all very wheat-y, but as Meg says in the comment below, there are many recipes using rice flour. Actually, I was just looking to make sure when she commented, and they look so amazingly good. Not only recipes using rice flour, but sticky rice as well. Such a good book!

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  2. Yes! So glad you are on board Julia! Looks great!
    And- gluttonforlife, yes there are many rice flour recipes! And they are fantastic!

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    1. Thanks, Meg! Yes, I'm looking forward to the amazing rice flour goodies you guys made. Do you think this book would be worth it for someone gluten-free?

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  3. Wow, looking at that first photo on a gloomy Sunday evening, I can picture myself sitting down with a big plate of those and just filling my face with them. But they look terribly hard to make. If this book makes it as easy as you say I just might have to look into it.

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    1. You know, I felt a little put off at first because the directions are SO long. But, as you read through the recipe you realize it's very simple, just very detailed. The two recipes I made are about as easy as it gets. There are certainly much more daunting ones. But the first two made me feel like I could at least attempt the more difficult ones. Try to get it out from the library! I'm going to make (and eat) more this week--and yes, this crummy weather is perfect for it!

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  4. These look like the pierogis my off-the-boat Polish grandma used to make. I wish I would have spent more time in the kitchen with her when I had the chance :) :(

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    1. Cathy- I was totally thinking pierogis when I made them! I have yet to fine a recipe that I like for the dough, but I really think this is it. I'm going to try it out. Thanks for commenting!

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